Daily Archives April 22, 2015

How To Deal With A Whiplash Injury

How To Deal With A Whiplash Injury

by: Mohammad Latif

Having the right accident solicitor makes all the difference in the world when you make a whiplash injury claim. Choosing the wrong one means you’re back behind the wheel, at the accident.
It happens all the time: long, tiresome travel, a moment of distraction or a sudden meeting with a road-hog – and suddenly you end up in a crash. Whiplash injury is very often, maybe 80% of the time, the result of car accidents.
It’s an injury caused when the neck suddenly jerks backwards and forward or vice versa during a collision. A small percentage of whiplash injuries can cause traumas lasting many several years with many chronic problems. Each year British insurers deal with approximately 250,000 claims for this kind of injury! That’s a quarter of a million claims.
Recognise The Symptoms!
There are no two identical accidents and the symptoms of a whiplash injury may vary depending on e.g. vehicles’ speed, kind of collision (whether it’s front, rear or side), etc. Saying all that, there are some symptoms, which may often vary on a day-to-day basis. Victims can suffer from headaches, dizziness and nausea together with vomiting. Shoulders and arms become stiff or numb or one can feel neck and back pains or ‘pins and needles’ type of feeling. Blurred vision and ringing in the ears may also occur.
The Whiplash Injury Claim
As you will see, whiplash injury may result in long months of health problems and discomfort. Wearing a collar support, living on pain and anti-inflammatory medications – is not an easy time for anyone. Not mentioning how it can affect your daily job making it difficult or even impossible to perform the simplest task...

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Pleas & Court Appearances in New York Criminal Cou

Pleas & Court Appearances in New York Criminal Courts

by: Susan Chana Lask, Esq.

At arraignment, the District Attorney may offer a plea to a lesser charge than what you were arrested for originally. Pleas are offered to unburden an extremely congested criminal court calendar, as well as to get rid of lesser criminal cases so the District Attorney can rightfully concentrate on the more serious crimes.
If you were arrested for misdemeanor shoplifting and you arrive at the arraignment with no prior arrests, most likely the District Attorney will offer you the option of pleading guilty to a lesser violation and a few days of community service with a fine. You have the option to end the process by accepting the lower charge of a violation, which is not a crime but will appear on your record in the future.
If you accept the plea then you will actually plead guilty to a lesser offense on the record and the court will most likely impose a fine and community service or counseling, depending upon what you and the District Attorney agreed to.
If you don’t accept the plea, you will simply plead “not guilty” and continue your criminal court appearances. Your attorney will file various motions and hold hearings to discover what evidence the District Attorney has against you or to get the charges dismissed. An example of such a hearing would be called a “Huntley Hearing”. In that hearing your attorney’s objective is to get any incriminating statements you made suppressed, meaning they can not be used against you. The point of that hearing is that the police obtained statements from you invlountarily. At the hearing your attorney will cross-examine the police involved in your arrest by asking them detailed questions...

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Service by Substitution in California

Service by Substitution in California

by: David G Hallstrom

The following article was written for Resources For Attorneys.com by David Hallstrom, a private investigator, he is not now nor has he ever been an attorney.
Section 415.20 (b) of the California Civil Code Of Procedure States: If a copy of the summons and complaint cannot with reasonable diligence be personally delivered to the person to be served, as specified in Section 416.60, 416.70, 416.80, or 416.90, a summons may be served by leaving a copy of the summons and complaint at the person’s dwelling house, usual place of abode, usual place of business, or usual mailing address other than a United States Postal Service post office box, in the presence of a competent member of the household or a person apparently in charge of his or her office, place of business, or usual mailing address other than a United States Postal Service post office box, at least 18 years of age, who shall be informed of the contents thereof, and by thereafter mailing a copy of the summons and of the complaint by first-class mail, postage prepaid to the person to be served at the place where a copy of the summons and complaint were left. Service of a summons in this manner is deemed complete on the 10th day after the mailing.
Most process servers understand dwelling house or usual place of abode to mean the actual place where the person is currently staying. It has, however, been our experience that this means the official residence or place where the person is currently staying. We have found that most courts consider the dwelling house to be where the person is currently staying and the usual place of abode to mean the persons permanent residence, ie: the person lives with his parents but is currently away at school...

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Psst.. Pass It On.. I Found Out It’s a Hoax..

Psst.. Pass It On.. I Found Out It’s a Hoax..

by: Bill Platt

When you receive an email telling you about a virus, what do you do with it? Do you send it to everyone in your address book to help them protect themselves too?
A virus warning is probably on its way to your inbox right now, claiming to be from a credible source and warning you of a dangerous virus on the loose. Beware. You might be tricked into taking part in an Internet hoax – chain mail virus alerts.
It is believed that 60% plus of the Virus Warnings in circulation are hoaxes. Further, your anti-virus software may already have a cure for this particular ailment IF it is real.
Even old hoaxes, which have been around for years, can make the rounds again, according to Trend Micro, an anti-virus software company.
‘There are a number of new hoaxes because they are so easy to write, you don’t need to be a programmer,’ the anti-virus company spokesperson said.
What about all of those ‘Get Paid to Send Email’ schemes? Do you forward them along too, because you do not know if they are true or not, and figure ‘why should I take the chance that it is not real?’ These ‘Get Paid to Send Email’ schemes are a fine example of hoaxes that can make the rounds again and again.
There have been at least a dozen incarnations of a ‘Get Paid to Send Email’ hoax recorded at several of the hoax sites listed in this article. For the complete story, try the search terms ‘Bill Gates’ or ‘Nike’ or ‘AOL / Microsoft’ at any of the Hoax sites.
Let me cut to the chase, no one has the technology to track emails sent through the Internet! No one will ever pay you for sending emails to everyone in your address book! This story is a verified hoax.
Here is a list of Hoax Information Sites that you can check the validity of the warning or the m...

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Incorporating Tips – Capitalization

Incorporating Tips – Capitalization

by: Richard A. Chapo

Capitalizing a new business entity is a critical step of the formation process. Failing to take the step can lead to serious legal problems if the entity is ever sued. So, what is capitalization and what steps must be taken?
Capitalizing Your Corporation
“Capitalization” essentially refers to funding your corporation. In essence, you are providing substance to the entity in the form of money or property. Typically, the funding process works in two ways.
Corporate Stock
You must own stock in a corporation to be considered a shareholder. You are already familiar with this concept if you trade on the stock market. For instance, assume you bought stock in Sirius Radio in anticipation of Howard Stern moving to the station. You purchased stock through a brokerage or retirement vehicle by exchanging money for shares. Technically, you are a shareholder in the corporation. Your own corporation is no different.
The fact that you paid money to have a corporation formed does not make you a shareholder. You must exchange property, cash or services to obtain stock from the entity. Only then are you a shareholder in the entity. This is more easily explained with an example.
Assume I start a corporation for the purpose of providing consulting services to other businesses. The corporation is formed with 10,000 shares and I am going to be the sole shareholder. I have cash and certain assets that I am going to use as part of the business. I decide to exchange $3,000, a copier, fax machine and computer equipment for stock in the entity. This exchange should be reduced to writing, but will constitute the capitalization of the corporation.
Corporate Loan
You can also loan money to a corporate entity for start-up costs...

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